LONG WORK HOURS DON’T WORK FOR PEOPLE OR THE PLANET

by David Suzuki with contributions from David Suzuki Foundation Senior Editor Ian Hanington. In 1926, U.S. automaker Henry Ford reduced his employees’ workweek from six eight-hour days to five, with no pay cuts. It’s something workers and labour unions had been calling for, and it followed previous reductions in work schedules that had been as high as 84 to 100 hours over seven days a week.   Ford wasn’t responding to worker demands; he was being a businessman. He expected increased productivity and knew workers with more time and money would buy and use the products they were making....

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